RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: EXERCISES FOR PEOPLE WITH CONTROLLED JOINTS

The stable or inactive joint is one which was previously inflamed but is now under satisfactory control. It is not necessarily a normal joint because damage may have occurred in the past and changed its appearance and function.
Controlled or stable joints are generally not warm to the touch. They also display only minimal morning stiffness and tenderness. They may appear enlarged but are usually not filled with fluid.
Exercise recommendations for controlled joints depend on the amount of damage remaining as a consequence of past inflammation. General guidelines include the following:
1.  Continue daily range-of-motion exercises with a maximum of ten repetitions. You can decrease number of repetitions to two or three when maximal range of motion has been obtained.
Goal: Maintain and increase motion and flexibility.
Precautions: Cut back repetitions if increased pain or swelling becomes evident.
2.  Continue isometric strengthening exercises as with moderately inflamed joints. Once maximum strength is achieved you will be able to cut down on these exercises and devote more time to aerobic exercise. Your therapist may also suggest a form of isotonic exercise with small weights if your joints are under excellent control and do not show any sign of significant damage.
Goal: Increase strength
Precautions: All strengthening exercise programs should be reviewed with your doctor or therapist. Placing inappropriate stress on damaged joints can result in increased deformity. Never use weights without checking first with your doctor or therapist.
3. Endurance exercises are most important in this stage to help you regain aerobic conditioning lost when the arthritis was more active. Swimming is still the best form of exercise, but other forms of low-impact aerobics may be considered (for example, walking, bicycling and low-impact dancing). Half an hour of aerobic exercise three times weekly will increase your fitness. As you grow stronger and spend more time with endurance exercises, you can eliminate most of your strengthening and range-of-motion exercises, although it is a good idea to continue range-of-motion exercises with affected joints. This will prevent shrinking or shortening of the muscle.
Goal: Increase endurance and fitness.
Precautions: Review all aerobic exercises with your physician, who is familiar with your degree of joint damage and other specific health problems that may interfere with aerobic exercise.
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RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: EXERCISES FOR PEOPLE WITH CONTROLLED JOINTSThe stable or inactive joint is one which was previously inflamed but is now under satisfactory control. It is not necessarily a normal joint because damage may have occurred in the past and changed its appearance and function.Controlled or stable joints are generally not warm to the touch. They also display only minimal morning stiffness and tenderness. They may appear enlarged but are usually not filled with fluid.Exercise recommendations for controlled joints depend on the amount of damage remaining as a consequence of past inflammation. General guidelines include the following:1.  Continue daily range-of-motion exercises with a maximum of ten repetitions. You can decrease number of repetitions to two or three when maximal range of motion has been obtained.Goal: Maintain and increase motion and flexibility. Precautions: Cut back repetitions if increased pain or swelling becomes evident.2.  Continue isometric strengthening exercises as with moderately inflamed joints. Once maximum strength is achieved you will be able to cut down on these exercises and devote more time to aerobic exercise. Your therapist may also suggest a form of isotonic exercise with small weights if your joints are under excellent control and do not show any sign of significant damage.Goal: Increase strengthPrecautions: All strengthening exercise programs should be reviewed with your doctor or therapist. Placing inappropriate stress on damaged joints can result in increased deformity. Never use weights without checking first with your doctor or therapist.3. Endurance exercises are most important in this stage to help you regain aerobic conditioning lost when the arthritis was more active. Swimming is still the best form of exercise, but other forms of low-impact aerobics may be considered (for example, walking, bicycling and low-impact dancing). Half an hour of aerobic exercise three times weekly will increase your fitness. As you grow stronger and spend more time with endurance exercises, you can eliminate most of your strengthening and range-of-motion exercises, although it is a good idea to continue range-of-motion exercises with affected joints. This will prevent shrinking or shortening of the muscle. Goal: Increase endurance and fitness.Precautions: Review all aerobic exercises with your physician, who is familiar with your degree of joint damage and other specific health problems that may interfere with aerobic exercise.*76/209/5*

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