TRANS-FATS

One of the reasons why omega-6 fats may be a problem for breast cancer is that as they are so unstable, and are often the subject of chemical extraction processes that damage the oils, they may become
I the source of rogue ‘free radicals’ – damaging compounds which corrupt healthy cells. In this way they may initiate cancer in the first place, and also burden the body’s immune system. Another reason may be an excess of omega-6 fats when compared to omega-3 fats, probably due to our reliance on margarines and vegetable cooking oils.
Under particular suspicion are the so-called unsaturated fats-hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated margarines. These have undergone a process to turn a liquid oil (such as sunflower oil) into a fat which is solid at room temperature. This is why I call them ‘so-called’ as they have become ‘honorary’ saturated fats by processing. They are even more problematic than natural saturated fats since they contain ‘trans-fats’ which are highly damaging. Margarines are cheap and stable and are therefore beloved of food manufacturers. Manufactured products such as biscuits, potato crisps, pies, cakes and pastries will have hydrogenated fats as an ingredient because they allow for a long shelf-life. While manufacturers claim that a small percentage of their overall ingredients have been turned into trans-fats (2-17 per cent), what they don’t tell you is that it has been shown that these fats accumulate in women’s breasts, and particularly so in women with breast cancer. Here they can damage cell membranes and interfere with correct hormone and prostaglandin function.
Trans-fats are also created when oils are extracted by chemical processes, a process which is used as an alternative to pressing which would provide a low yield, or where the appearance or flavour of the oil needs to be altered. For example, grape seed oil or avocado oil is naturally dark and unpleasant-tasting in the raw, so chemical solvents are used to extract the oils. As com has a low fat content, extremely high temperatures and toxic solvents are used to extract the oil efficiently, and the same is often true of soya oil. These processes make the oils high in trans-fats and chemical residues.
*69\240\2*

TRANS-FATSOne of the reasons why omega-6 fats may be a problem for breast cancer is that as they are so unstable, and are often the subject of chemical extraction processes that damage the oils, they may becomeI the source of rogue ‘free radicals’ – damaging compounds which corrupt healthy cells. In this way they may initiate cancer in the first place, and also burden the body’s immune system. Another reason may be an excess of omega-6 fats when compared to omega-3 fats, probably due to our reliance on margarines and vegetable cooking oils.     Under particular suspicion are the so-called unsaturated fats-hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated margarines. These have undergone a process to turn a liquid oil (such as sunflower oil) into a fat which is solid at room temperature. This is why I call them ‘so-called’ as they have become ‘honorary’ saturated fats by processing. They are even more problematic than natural saturated fats since they contain ‘trans-fats’ which are highly damaging. Margarines are cheap and stable and are therefore beloved of food manufacturers. Manufactured products such as biscuits, potato crisps, pies, cakes and pastries will have hydrogenated fats as an ingredient because they allow for a long shelf-life. While manufacturers claim that a small percentage of their overall ingredients have been turned into trans-fats (2-17 per cent), what they don’t tell you is that it has been shown that these fats accumulate in women’s breasts, and particularly so in women with breast cancer. Here they can damage cell membranes and interfere with correct hormone and prostaglandin function.     Trans-fats are also created when oils are extracted by chemical processes, a process which is used as an alternative to pressing which would provide a low yield, or where the appearance or flavour of the oil needs to be altered. For example, grape seed oil or avocado oil is naturally dark and unpleasant-tasting in the raw, so chemical solvents are used to extract the oils. As com has a low fat content, extremely high temperatures and toxic solvents are used to extract the oil efficiently, and the same is often true of soya oil. These processes make the oils high in trans-fats and chemical residues.*69\240\2*

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

Random Posts

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.