Archive for the ‘Arthritis’ Category

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: EXERCISES FOR PEOPLE WITH CONTROLLED JOINTS

Friday, January 7th, 2011
The stable or inactive joint is one which was previously inflamed but is now under satisfactory control. It is not necessarily a normal joint because damage may have occurred in the past and changed its appearance and function.
Controlled or stable joints are generally not warm to the touch. They also display only minimal morning stiffness and tenderness. They may appear enlarged but are usually not filled with fluid.
Exercise recommendations for controlled joints depend on the amount of damage remaining as a consequence of past inflammation. General guidelines include the following:
1.  Continue daily range-of-motion exercises with a maximum of ten repetitions. You can decrease number of repetitions to two or three when maximal range of motion has been obtained.
Goal: Maintain and increase motion and flexibility.
Precautions: Cut back repetitions if increased pain or swelling becomes evident.
2.  Continue isometric strengthening exercises as with moderately inflamed joints. Once maximum strength is achieved you will be able to cut down on these exercises and devote more time to aerobic exercise. Your therapist may also suggest a form of isotonic exercise with small weights if your joints are under excellent control and do not show any sign of significant damage.
Goal: Increase strength
Precautions: All strengthening exercise programs should be reviewed with your doctor or therapist. Placing inappropriate stress on damaged joints can result in increased deformity. Never use weights without checking first with your doctor or therapist.
3. Endurance exercises are most important in this stage to help you regain aerobic conditioning lost when the arthritis was more active. Swimming is still the best form of exercise, but other forms of low-impact aerobics may be considered (for example, walking, bicycling and low-impact dancing). Half an hour of aerobic exercise three times weekly will increase your fitness. As you grow stronger and spend more time with endurance exercises, you can eliminate most of your strengthening and range-of-motion exercises, although it is a good idea to continue range-of-motion exercises with affected joints. This will prevent shrinking or shortening of the muscle.
Goal: Increase endurance and fitness.
Precautions: Review all aerobic exercises with your physician, who is familiar with your degree of joint damage and other specific health problems that may interfere with aerobic exercise.
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RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: EXERCISES FOR PEOPLE WITH CONTROLLED JOINTSThe stable or inactive joint is one which was previously inflamed but is now under satisfactory control. It is not necessarily a normal joint because damage may have occurred in the past and changed its appearance and function.Controlled or stable joints are generally not warm to the touch. They also display only minimal morning stiffness and tenderness. They may appear enlarged but are usually not filled with fluid.Exercise recommendations for controlled joints depend on the amount of damage remaining as a consequence of past inflammation. General guidelines include the following:1.  Continue daily range-of-motion exercises with a maximum of ten repetitions. You can decrease number of repetitions to two or three when maximal range of motion has been obtained.Goal: Maintain and increase motion and flexibility. Precautions: Cut back repetitions if increased pain or swelling becomes evident.2.  Continue isometric strengthening exercises as with moderately inflamed joints. Once maximum strength is achieved you will be able to cut down on these exercises and devote more time to aerobic exercise. Your therapist may also suggest a form of isotonic exercise with small weights if your joints are under excellent control and do not show any sign of significant damage.Goal: Increase strengthPrecautions: All strengthening exercise programs should be reviewed with your doctor or therapist. Placing inappropriate stress on damaged joints can result in increased deformity. Never use weights without checking first with your doctor or therapist.3. Endurance exercises are most important in this stage to help you regain aerobic conditioning lost when the arthritis was more active. Swimming is still the best form of exercise, but other forms of low-impact aerobics may be considered (for example, walking, bicycling and low-impact dancing). Half an hour of aerobic exercise three times weekly will increase your fitness. As you grow stronger and spend more time with endurance exercises, you can eliminate most of your strengthening and range-of-motion exercises, although it is a good idea to continue range-of-motion exercises with affected joints. This will prevent shrinking or shortening of the muscle. Goal: Increase endurance and fitness.Precautions: Review all aerobic exercises with your physician, who is familiar with your degree of joint damage and other specific health problems that may interfere with aerobic exercise.*76/209/5*

SHOULD ARTHRITIS SUFFERERS ADHERE TO A HIGH-PROTEIN DIET?

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

Americans have been so brainwashed with the “high-protein” idea that it makes me feel like a heretic of sorts to try to discredit this high-protein myth.

Everybody from a schoolchild to grandma “knows” that a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is best for your health. You read this in the medical, syndicated columns of your daily newspaper; you hear this on TV and radio commercials; you read about it in the popular health magazines and in books on nutrition by the “experts.” We all have been fed this propaganda and been geared for the high-protein cult for decades— from all possible directions, even from roadside billboards and “beef for health” stickers on automobile bumpers! We are advised by “authorities” to eat lots of meat, eggs, fish, and milk and to get as much protein as possible. In fact, many nutritionists will tell you that you can never get too much protein. And in our kindly American way we feel sorry for all the poor people in “underdeveloped” countries who “don’t get enough protein.”

How did this false myth originate? I don’t really know. Maybe meat-packing industries have some part to play in it. Or perhaps the scientific fact that our bodies are made up mostly of proteins is responsible for it. Whatever the reason, our present nutritional and medical, as well as general public thinking is in complete accord concerning the necessity of a high-protein diet for good health.

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ARTHRITIS BEATEN TODAY-CMO: THE IDEAL PROGRAM, CMO AS A PREVENTIVE, AND RECENT DEVELOPMENTS-AN IDEAL PROGRAM

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

Even though CMO halts autoimmune inflammatory processes, it has no direct anti-inflammatory action of its own. Even though it stops autoimmune attacks at their source (the memory T-cells), and allows the regeneration of cartilage to build up undisturbed, CMO provides no nutrients to encourage it. Combining CMO with sea cucumber would then provide more immediate

anti-inflammatory action as well as some nutrients to help rebuild cartilage and encourage the production of synovial fluid for the lubrication of the joints. Adding 100 milligrams of sea cucumber extract to the time-tested dosage program using 385 milligrams of certified CMO per capsule, taking two capsules each morning and evening, a total of 4 capsules per day, is proven to be of great benefit in my clinical experience.

This course of nutritional therapy should then be followed up by taking a dosage of 400 to 750 milligrams of timed-release glucosamine sulphate twice a day, and 200 to 500 milligrams of DLPA twice a day. This will provide the nutrients needed to repair and maintain good joint health and continuing comfort. Because glucosamine is excreted from the body so very quickly, using a newly developed, proprietary sustained release version is far more effective because it maintains stable blood glucosamine levels throughout the day and night. That’s far better than the stop-start routine of ordinary glucosamine products.

I recommend the following as an ideal program for nutritional therapy of an existing condition, maintenance from a relapse and prevention against developing an ailment. My recommendation is borne out the experience of thousands taking CMO in the past few years.

Take the CMO for an initial several week period to stop the destructive autoimmune process. Follow this up with longer term taking of the timed-release glucosamine and DLPA in the dosages previously mentioned and sea cucumber extracts to suit. This is designed to encourage repair work. You may then consider taking “refresher” courses of CMO in periods varying from every few months to eighteen or more months, depending on your individual circumstances and your environment. This is designed to kick-start your improvement as well as act as a preventive.

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