Archive for the ‘Asthma’ Category

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: DIAGNOSIS METHODS

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011
Questionnaires
All questionnaires, including the one that follows, will help you or your therapist to diagnose candida-related problems, therefore one of the most important tools for the diagnosis of candidiasis remains a thorough medical history.
In many cases a questionnaire is enough to establish at least a connection between your health problems and Candida albicans. One must be careful, however, not to rely exclusively on questionnaires because, apart from being a subjective interpretation, they may not differentiate between Candida infections or allergies as a cause, and Candida as a symptom of disease.
The most often forgotten point when relying on questionnaires is the fact that Candida albicans is an opportunistic organism and is therefore likely to cause problems as a result of something else which has upset the body’s balance in general and immunity in particular. If this is not recognised and thoroughly investigated, it is possible to waste a lot of time treating the consequences (candida infection or allergy, which in such cases are only symptoms) of a problem which remains undetected, undiagnosed and untreated. The fact that someone may initially feel better, even a lot better, when treatment directed at Candida is first started does not necessarily mean that Candida was the problem. In fact, this is usually the case when someone tries to treat candidiasis with diet alone. There is little doubt that most people will feel better if they avoid junk foods and reduce refined carbohydrates and sweets. But they would feel better on such a regimen even if they did not suffer with a Candida problem. They would also feel better if they were allergic, hypoglycaemic or had a nutritional imbalance or deficiency.
Doctors William Crook, Orion Truss and many other writers on the subject have included Candida questionnaires in their books. While some, like Dr Crook’s, are the most thorough and accurate available, others may need some updating for the 1990s. The reasons will become clear when you read the comments at the end of each question below.
When to Suspect Candida
1 If you have ever had vaginal thrush but this condition was only treated topically (vaginally) without the concurrent use of oral anti fungals and a suitable diet.
• This point is almost invariably valid in establishing at least the possibility that Candida is involved in your health problems.
2 If you have taken antibiotics, especially of the broad-spectrum variety, many times during childhood and again later on.
• This is also a good indication that Candida is a possibility. In addition, many people have taken antibiotics without ever knowing it simply because antibiotics are added to the feed of chicken, cows and pigs.
3 If you have suffered with recurrent ear infections, tinea, athlete’s foot, nail infections (paronychia), skin rashes, nappy rashes, oral thrush, colic, jock itch and allergies during infancy, childhood or since.
• This is a very good pointer, provided one understands clearly that all the symptoms mentioned are also possible results of hereditary allergies, depressed immunity and, in some cases, diseases like diabetes, AIDS and post-viral syndromes. All these are factors which can be investigated with reasonable accuracy through blood tests and further questioning and examination.
4 If your problems started after taking the oral contraceptive.
• This is often quite valid, unless the problem is a hormonal one.
5 If you are, or have been pregnant and have (had) symptoms of vaginal thrush at the time.
• Usually a valid point.
6 If you suffer from any type (there are at least five) of premenstrual syndrome.
• This is also a valid pointer, but you need to exclude the many possible causes for each type of PMS, such as APICH (Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Immune-dysregulation Candidiasis Hypersensitivy), thyroid problems, hormonal imbalances, hyperoestrogenism, and so on.
7 If you have suffered from pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or endometriosis.
• Both PID and endometriosis may be caused by a variety of factors but, if no cause has been found for their occurrence, the symptoms may be associated with undiagnosed candidiasis.
8 If you have or have had recurring nasal polyps.
• This may be due to a respiratory allergy to moulds as well as other factors, although a Candida infection or allergy can be a triggering or contributing factor.
9 If you have been treated with immuno-suppressive drugs such as steroids; cortisone; and prednisolone for skin problems, asthma, arthritis.
• A very valid point, provided one understands clearly that the patient must be thoroughly evaluated first to exclude the many other possible side effects of such drugs.
10 If your symptoms seem to be aggravated when you eat
foods containing yeast or moulds.
• A valid point but further tests are always needed to differentiate between infection and allergy.
11 If your symptoms tend to come on, or get worse, during
wet weather, on humid days, or when exposed to damp-
ness, as in cellars, attics and so on.
• Quite valid but again, a common sign of moulds allergy or intolerance. This is especially so if many of the symptoms involve the ear, nose, throat and chest and manifest as sinusitis, hay fever or asthma.
12 If you feel tired out on damp days or after working in the
garden in wet days.
• Especially valid in cases of Candida, mould/fungi allergies.
13 If you are uncomfortable around chemical pollution
such as cigarette smoke, petrol fumes, gas heater,
insecticides and perfumes.
• Although chronic Candida can trigger allergies and reduce resistance to the point where one becomes sensitive to all sorts of chemicals, such hypersensitivity is also very common in asthmatics as well as universal reactors, chronic fatigue syndrome (ME), chemical overloading/allergy, post-viral syndrome, chronic Epstein Barr, CMV, HSC post-viral syndromes and, of course, in cases of environmental illnesses. You must bear in mind, however, that Candida is a very common symptom of all those conditions. Note that it is possible for Candida albicans to facilitate, trigger or provoke those conditions as well.
14 If you experience recurrent craving for sweets, alcohol
and carbohydrates.
• Not a valid point for several reasons. First of all, cravings are associated with many other conditions such as allergies (one tends to crave what one is allergic to) and hypoglycaemia. Secondly, although many people suffering with Candida do indeed crave sweets, many actually crave the opposite type of foods — salty, cheese snacks or foods derived from or containing yeast, moulds or fungi or fermented foods. Often these will make them feel better for a while (like a hypoglycaemic eating sweets), only to cause a rebound worsening of the symptoms later on. This is especially so when the thyroid is involved, as it is in cases of APICH.
15 If you suffer from depression.
• This is one of the least valid indicators and can have dire consequences unless looked at very carefully. Depression can simply be an emotional state which results from a disease and clinical depression is a condition in its own right. It is also difficult, if not impossible, to be ill for a time without being depressed about it. That ‘about it’ is the key to many hidden dangers for  the  unsophisticated  diagnostician, because if one is depressed in general, then the clinical depression can have many very different causes, from a vitamin B12 deficiency or a lack of sunshine all the way to chemical overloading or CFS and anything in between.
16 If you are continuously tired for no reason.
• While chronic tiredness can be a useful clue, it can’t be assumed that it is caused by Candida. So many diseases, from cancer to anaemia, and so many factors, from financial difficulties to overwork, can make one feel tired all the time.
17 If you have problems concentrating, remembering
things and a general feeling of being spaced out.
• A primary symptom of chemical overloading and multiple chemical hypersensitivity syndrome (MCHS), it is nevertheless common in many other conditions such as CFS, PVS, early Alzheimer’s and hypoglycaemia. It is, however, also associated with chronic candidiasis.
18 If you have problems controlling your weight.
• While it is true that Candida sufferers often have weight problems it is equally true that one can be overweight, as well as tired, with PMS, bloating and skin rashes, as a result of a low thyroid, poor liver clearance of oestrogen and at least a dozen other causes.
19 If you experience recurring sore throats, nasal con-
gestion, hay fever, sinusitis or ear infections.
• Also common with allergies, poor immunity, intolerances, post-viral syndromes and CFS.
20 If you crave or have a subconscious preference for yeast
derived or yeast containing foods such as cheeses, beer,
wines, commercial fruit juices and vinegar.
• This is sometimes a sign of a need for supplementation with the amino acid L tyrosine.
21 If you find sweets give you a pick up but you feel worse
later on.
• This condition is always associated with hypoglycaemia and allergies but does not necessarily involve Candida problems.
22 If you have experienced recurring ear infection or have
had ‘glue ear’ as a child.
• A valid point, especially if you note that glue ear is associated with allergies and that these can predispose one to recurrent Candida infections. In addition, multiple pregnancies, chronic or repeated infections, a diet very high in sugar, recurrent cystitis, loss of libido (sexual desire) and skin problems are signs of possible Candida overgrowth or sensitisation. Affected people tend to react to yeasty, sugary foods in one of two ways: they either feel worse and suffer an aggravation of their symptoms or get a temporary lift in energy and mood.
Diagnosis by Examination
A thorough examination of the throat, ear, nose and skin can be very helpful in establishing the presence or effects of Candida infections. Especially so when one knows that the throat area is one of the most common and plentiful reservoirs of Candida albicans. This may seem rather obvious to the lay reader but I can assure you that I have seen patients who told me they had their local GP diagnose or not diagnose Candida without even looking at their mouth, let alone ears, nose and skin!
At the same time lung function measurements should be taken and the type, dose and frequency of any anti-asthma medication should be carefully recorded.
Capillography
An excellent test for allergies, especially food and chemical sensitivities, this test was adapted from a non-invasive test for heart and circulation diseases. While not specific for Candida, it will often indicate a disturbed physical condition.
*60\145\2*

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: DIAGNOSIS METHODSQuestionnairesAll questionnaires, including the one that follows, will help you or your therapist to diagnose candida-related problems, therefore one of the most important tools for the diagnosis of candidiasis remains a thorough medical history.In many cases a questionnaire is enough to establish at least a connection between your health problems and Candida albicans. One must be careful, however, not to rely exclusively on questionnaires because, apart from being a subjective interpretation, they may not differentiate between Candida infections or allergies as a cause, and Candida as a symptom of disease.The most often forgotten point when relying on questionnaires is the fact that Candida albicans is an opportunistic organism and is therefore likely to cause problems as a result of something else which has upset the body’s balance in general and immunity in particular. If this is not recognised and thoroughly investigated, it is possible to waste a lot of time treating the consequences (candida infection or allergy, which in such cases are only symptoms) of a problem which remains undetected, undiagnosed and untreated. The fact that someone may initially feel better, even a lot better, when treatment directed at Candida is first started does not necessarily mean that Candida was the problem. In fact, this is usually the case when someone tries to treat candidiasis with diet alone. There is little doubt that most people will feel better if they avoid junk foods and reduce refined carbohydrates and sweets. But they would feel better on such a regimen even if they did not suffer with a Candida problem. They would also feel better if they were allergic, hypoglycaemic or had a nutritional imbalance or deficiency.Doctors William Crook, Orion Truss and many other writers on the subject have included Candida questionnaires in their books. While some, like Dr Crook’s, are the most thorough and accurate available, others may need some updating for the 1990s. The reasons will become clear when you read the comments at the end of each question below.When to Suspect Candida1 If you have ever had vaginal thrush but this condition was only treated topically (vaginally) without the concurrent use of oral anti fungals and a suitable diet.• This point is almost invariably valid in establishing at least the possibility that Candida is involved in your health problems.2 If you have taken antibiotics, especially of the broad-spectrum variety, many times during childhood and again later on.• This is also a good indication that Candida is a possibility. In addition, many people have taken antibiotics without ever knowing it simply because antibiotics are added to the feed of chicken, cows and pigs.3 If you have suffered with recurrent ear infections, tinea, athlete’s foot, nail infections (paronychia), skin rashes, nappy rashes, oral thrush, colic, jock itch and allergies during infancy, childhood or since.• This is a very good pointer, provided one understands clearly that all the symptoms mentioned are also possible results of hereditary allergies, depressed immunity and, in some cases, diseases like diabetes, AIDS and post-viral syndromes. All these are factors which can be investigated with reasonable accuracy through blood tests and further questioning and examination.4 If your problems started after taking the oral contraceptive.• This is often quite valid, unless the problem is a hormonal one.5 If you are, or have been pregnant and have (had) symptoms of vaginal thrush at the time.• Usually a valid point.6 If you suffer from any type (there are at least five) of premenstrual syndrome.• This is also a valid pointer, but you need to exclude the many possible causes for each type of PMS, such as APICH (Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Immune-dysregulation Candidiasis Hypersensitivy), thyroid problems, hormonal imbalances, hyperoestrogenism, and so on.7 If you have suffered from pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or endometriosis.• Both PID and endometriosis may be caused by a variety of factors but, if no cause has been found for their occurrence, the symptoms may be associated with undiagnosed candidiasis.8 If you have or have had recurring nasal polyps.• This may be due to a respiratory allergy to moulds as well as other factors, although a Candida infection or allergy can be a triggering or contributing factor.9 If you have been treated with immuno-suppressive drugs such as steroids; cortisone; and prednisolone for skin problems, asthma, arthritis.• A very valid point, provided one understands clearly that the patient must be thoroughly evaluated first to exclude the many other possible side effects of such drugs.10 If your symptoms seem to be aggravated when you eatfoods containing yeast or moulds.• A valid point but further tests are always needed to differentiate between infection and allergy.11 If your symptoms tend to come on, or get worse, duringwet weather, on humid days, or when exposed to damp-ness, as in cellars, attics and so on.• Quite valid but again, a common sign of moulds allergy or intolerance. This is especially so if many of the symptoms involve the ear, nose, throat and chest and manifest as sinusitis, hay fever or asthma.12 If you feel tired out on damp days or after working in thegarden in wet days.• Especially valid in cases of Candida, mould/fungi allergies.13 If you are uncomfortable around chemical pollutionsuch as cigarette smoke, petrol fumes, gas heater,insecticides and perfumes.• Although chronic Candida can trigger allergies and reduce resistance to the point where one becomes sensitive to all sorts of chemicals, such hypersensitivity is also very common in asthmatics as well as universal reactors, chronic fatigue syndrome (ME), chemical overloading/allergy, post-viral syndrome, chronic Epstein Barr, CMV, HSC post-viral syndromes and, of course, in cases of environmental illnesses. You must bear in mind, however, that Candida is a very common symptom of all those conditions. Note that it is possible for Candida albicans to facilitate, trigger or provoke those conditions as well.14 If you experience recurrent craving for sweets, alcoholand carbohydrates.• Not a valid point for several reasons. First of all, cravings are associated with many other conditions such as allergies (one tends to crave what one is allergic to) and hypoglycaemia. Secondly, although many people suffering with Candida do indeed crave sweets, many actually crave the opposite type of foods — salty, cheese snacks or foods derived from or containing yeast, moulds or fungi or fermented foods. Often these will make them feel better for a while (like a hypoglycaemic eating sweets), only to cause a rebound worsening of the symptoms later on. This is especially so when the thyroid is involved, as it is in cases of APICH.15 If you suffer from depression.• This is one of the least valid indicators and can have dire consequences unless looked at very carefully. Depression can simply be an emotional state which results from a disease and clinical depression is a condition in its own right. It is also difficult, if not impossible, to be ill for a time without being depressed about it. That ‘about it’ is the key to many hidden dangers for  the  unsophisticated  diagnostician, because if one is depressed in general, then the clinical depression can have many very different causes, from a vitamin B12 deficiency or a lack of sunshine all the way to chemical overloading or CFS and anything in between.16 If you are continuously tired for no reason.• While chronic tiredness can be a useful clue, it can’t be assumed that it is caused by Candida. So many diseases, from cancer to anaemia, and so many factors, from financial difficulties to overwork, can make one feel tired all the time.17 If you have problems concentrating, rememberingthings and a general feeling of being spaced out.• A primary symptom of chemical overloading and multiple chemical hypersensitivity syndrome (MCHS), it is nevertheless common in many other conditions such as CFS, PVS, early Alzheimer’s and hypoglycaemia. It is, however, also associated with chronic candidiasis.18 If you have problems controlling your weight.• While it is true that Candida sufferers often have weight problems it is equally true that one can be overweight, as well as tired, with PMS, bloating and skin rashes, as a result of a low thyroid, poor liver clearance of oestrogen and at least a dozen other causes.19 If you experience recurring sore throats, nasal con-gestion, hay fever, sinusitis or ear infections.• Also common with allergies, poor immunity, intolerances, post-viral syndromes and CFS.20 If you crave or have a subconscious preference for yeastderived or yeast containing foods such as cheeses, beer,wines, commercial fruit juices and vinegar.• This is sometimes a sign of a need for supplementation with the amino acid L tyrosine.21 If you find sweets give you a pick up but you feel worselater on.• This condition is always associated with hypoglycaemia and allergies but does not necessarily involve Candida problems.22 If you have experienced recurring ear infection or havehad ‘glue ear’ as a child.• A valid point, especially if you note that glue ear is associated with allergies and that these can predispose one to recurrent Candida infections. In addition, multiple pregnancies, chronic or repeated infections, a diet very high in sugar, recurrent cystitis, loss of libido (sexual desire) and skin problems are signs of possible Candida overgrowth or sensitisation. Affected people tend to react to yeasty, sugary foods in one of two ways: they either feel worse and suffer an aggravation of their symptoms or get a temporary lift in energy and mood.Diagnosis by ExaminationA thorough examination of the throat, ear, nose and skin can be very helpful in establishing the presence or effects of Candida infections. Especially so when one knows that the throat area is one of the most common and plentiful reservoirs of Candida albicans. This may seem rather obvious to the lay reader but I can assure you that I have seen patients who told me they had their local GP diagnose or not diagnose Candida without even looking at their mouth, let alone ears, nose and skin!At the same time lung function measurements should be taken and the type, dose and frequency of any anti-asthma medication should be carefully recorded.CapillographyAn excellent test for allergies, especially food and chemical sensitivities, this test was adapted from a non-invasive test for heart and circulation diseases. While not specific for Candida, it will often indicate a disturbed physical condition.*60\145\2*