Archive for the ‘Diabetes’ Category

DIABETES AND EXERCISE THERAPY: HOW MUCH EXERCISE

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

Duration : Exercise should have wanning up and cooling down period of 5-15 minutes. The usual duration of exercise is 20-60 minutes.Frequency of Exercise: To get the desired benefits of exercise one should do exercise at least 4-5 days in a week.Intensity of Exercise: Exercise should be uninterrupted and should gradually increase the heart rate 70-80% of the Maximum Heart Rate.How to calculate Maximum Heart Rate ?MHR = 220 – Age of a person in years, eg. if person’s age is 80 years his MHR will be = 220 – 80 years = 140 beats/min.Sub Maximal HR = 80% of MHR = 112 beats/minutes.Patient should learn an art to count his own radial pulse and can perform exercises which can increase his HR to 112/minutes at 80 years of age.Brisk walking3.6Cycling4.5Jogging4.5Running5.0Swimming6.0Badminton (Single)6.0Volley-Ball6.0Tennis7.0*39\329\8*

INSULIN INJECTIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH DIABETES

Friday, February 18th, 2011
On most occasions you will be able to take your morning insulin injection at home. There is no reason for you to come home to take your evening insulin. Draw it up in the morning and put the syringe in a small case or bag. Nowadays there are several devices such as BD Lilly pen or Novopen that can easily be carried in a pocket. Even an ordinary plastic syringe with needle, filled with insulin is reasonably portable, especially if you find a carrying case which prevents the plunger being pushed in by mistake. An empty syringe with needle and bottles of insulin with a foil-wrapped swab can also be carried in a pocket or case. You can then make a quick blood glucose check and give the appropriate insulin injection wherever you are.
Wendy has had diabetes for 14 of her 20 years. “She was always so good about her injections” said her mother, “and she always ate her diet and did her tests perfectly. Now I just can’t do a thing with her. Out all hours, won’t eat what I give her, eats junk food, not a single blood test this month. What are we to do with her, doctor?” Wendy sat m her bed looking at the wall. She had just recovered from an episode °f diabetic ketoacidosis. “What do you think about your diabetes, Wendy?” I asked. “I’m fed up with it,” she replied sullenly. “What makes you most fed up?” “Having to come home for my insulin.”
During our discussion Wendy said that she felt her diabetes was stopping her from doing everything she wanted – getting a job, going 0ut with her friends, eating nice food. Life was just not worth living. Wendy and her mother seemed to be fighting over the diabetes, yet Wendy was 20 years old. From what Wendy said, all anyone ever did about her diabetes was tell her off. When I told Wendy about insulin pens which would allow her freedom to go out, her mother developed a disapproving silence. But Wendy relaxed for the first time, and smiled a little, “Could I really have one of those?” she asked. “Of course,” I said. She agreed to come to the Young Adult diabetic clinic.
*48/102/5*

INSULIN INJECTIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH DIABETES
On most occasions you will be able to take your morning insulin injection at home. There is no reason for you to come home to take your evening insulin. Draw it up in the morning and put the syringe in a small case or bag. Nowadays there are several devices such as BD Lilly pen or Novopen that can easily be carried in a pocket. Even an ordinary plastic syringe with needle, filled with insulin is reasonably portable, especially if you find a carrying case which prevents the plunger being pushed in by mistake. An empty syringe with needle and bottles of insulin with a foil-wrapped swab can also be carried in a pocket or case. You can then make a quick blood glucose check and give the appropriate insulin injection wherever you are.Wendy has had diabetes for 14 of her 20 years. “She was always so good about her injections” said her mother, “and she always ate her diet and did her tests perfectly. Now I just can’t do a thing with her. Out all hours, won’t eat what I give her, eats junk food, not a single blood test this month. What are we to do with her, doctor?” Wendy sat m her bed looking at the wall. She had just recovered from an episode °f diabetic ketoacidosis. “What do you think about your diabetes, Wendy?” I asked. “I’m fed up with it,” she replied sullenly. “What makes you most fed up?” “Having to come home for my insulin.”During our discussion Wendy said that she felt her diabetes was stopping her from doing everything she wanted – getting a job, going 0ut with her friends, eating nice food. Life was just not worth living. Wendy and her mother seemed to be fighting over the diabetes, yet Wendy was 20 years old. From what Wendy said, all anyone ever did about her diabetes was tell her off. When I told Wendy about insulin pens which would allow her freedom to go out, her mother developed a disapproving silence. But Wendy relaxed for the first time, and smiled a little, “Could I really have one of those?” she asked. “Of course,” I said. She agreed to come to the Young Adult diabetic clinic.
*48/102/5*

TYPE II DIABETES AND WEIGHT PROBLEMS: SLOW TWO-STEP

Monday, February 7th, 2011
There are only two ways to lose weight:
•   One is to eat less food than you have been eating in the past.
•   Two is to exercise more than you have been doing in the past.
The trick behind success in weight loss and control is to balance these two activities so the efforts are comfortable and lasting.
Yes, if you want to maintain an ideal weight for the rest of your life, you will have to eat less and be more physically active. There is no way you can go back to your old ways and achieve success. You have to change your lifestyle to a new, better and healthier one.
Don’t expect that your battle of the bulge will be a quick one. You have added those kilograms on your hips and waistline by eating small amounts of food in excess of what your body really needs, over the past few decades. You may have started to overeat during childhood when your mother told you to clean your plate. You may have started to overeat during your teens when you found out you weren’t the most popular student. Or you may have started to overeat when you began to be stressed out by your job.
For you, overeating may not have been doubling the size of your food portions. It may only have been an extra scoop of ice-cream in your nightly snack. That scoop of ice-cream, at the end of one year, produced 2.5 extra kilograms of weight, usually in the form of stored fat. If you have had this ice-cream habit, with all other food intake and exercise expenditure equal, for the past ten years, you now carry twenty-five extra kilograms.
Now you can cut out the ice-cream, not change anything else, and ten years from now you may be twenty-five kilograms lighter. But there are more effective and faster ways for you to fight the fat monster. The first thing to remember is that you should approach weight control as a long-term lifestyle change. Don’t expect to change your eating and exercise habits overnight.
Don’t be tempted by the quick weight-loss diets touted on TV and in magazines. Most people who go on quick weight-loss diets eventually gain back all the weight they originally lost—and possibly more. The next time they try a quick weight-loss diet, they find it is more difficult to drop kilos and much easier to gain them back. If you’re tempted to follow this kind of weight-off, weight-on diet cycle (often called the yo-yo syndrome), you would be far better off to stay with your presently overweight body and not attempt any weight loss programme at all.
You can lose weight by cutting down on food or by increasing exercise. Either of these two approaches can work alone, but your weight-loss programme will be much more effective when you do both things at the same time. When you cut kilojoules and increase physical activity at the same time, weight loss becomes easier.
*39/210/5*

TYPE II DIABETES AND WEIGHT PROBLEMS: SLOW TWO-STEPThere are only two ways to lose weight:•   One is to eat less food than you have been eating in the past.•   Two is to exercise more than you have been doing in the past.The trick behind success in weight loss and control is to balance these two activities so the efforts are comfortable and lasting.Yes, if you want to maintain an ideal weight for the rest of your life, you will have to eat less and be more physically active. There is no way you can go back to your old ways and achieve success. You have to change your lifestyle to a new, better and healthier one.Don’t expect that your battle of the bulge will be a quick one. You have added those kilograms on your hips and waistline by eating small amounts of food in excess of what your body really needs, over the past few decades. You may have started to overeat during childhood when your mother told you to clean your plate. You may have started to overeat during your teens when you found out you weren’t the most popular student. Or you may have started to overeat when you began to be stressed out by your job.For you, overeating may not have been doubling the size of your food portions. It may only have been an extra scoop of ice-cream in your nightly snack. That scoop of ice-cream, at the end of one year, produced 2.5 extra kilograms of weight, usually in the form of stored fat. If you have had this ice-cream habit, with all other food intake and exercise expenditure equal, for the past ten years, you now carry twenty-five extra kilograms.Now you can cut out the ice-cream, not change anything else, and ten years from now you may be twenty-five kilograms lighter. But there are more effective and faster ways for you to fight the fat monster. The first thing to remember is that you should approach weight control as a long-term lifestyle change. Don’t expect to change your eating and exercise habits overnight.Don’t be tempted by the quick weight-loss diets touted on TV and in magazines. Most people who go on quick weight-loss diets eventually gain back all the weight they originally lost—and possibly more. The next time they try a quick weight-loss diet, they find it is more difficult to drop kilos and much easier to gain them back. If you’re tempted to follow this kind of weight-off, weight-on diet cycle (often called the yo-yo syndrome), you would be far better off to stay with your presently overweight body and not attempt any weight loss programme at all.You can lose weight by cutting down on food or by increasing exercise. Either of these two approaches can work alone, but your weight-loss programme will be much more effective when you do both things at the same time. When you cut kilojoules and increase physical activity at the same time, weight loss becomes easier.*39/210/5*